Rogue philosopher, autodidact, techno-savant, author of philosophical cypherpunk series, Madame Einzige.

Topics: Nietzsche, Postmodernity, Nihilism, Existentialism, Technology, Unintended Consequences, Informatics, Evolution, Biohistory, etc.

1st March 2014

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Have been obsessing over fractals lately — and really, who can’t? They are an interesting formalization and mathematical description of a natural phenomena, reaching the peak of its popularity since the 20th century, with the rise of computer graphics.

But remember — and in remembering, you are invoking from the ancestral habits and patterns made capable at all within the domain of human thought — that when the ancients spoke of the infintismal microcosm / macrocosm, they were speaking about fractals. When the ancients described the Emanation from the One, they were describing fractals. That Man is created in God’s image ( צֶלֶם אֱלֹהִים ), or the entire Great Chain of Being, or the Mandate of Heaven — all fractal concepts. When the first shaman-astronomers of the stone age were inquiring and passing on their lore about the stars, the spirits, nature, and her law, they were also aware of the fractal.

Most profoundly, the very first sentence of the cornerstone text of geometry, is a fractal. When Euclid in Book 1 defines the point, he also by extension implicitly defining the space around the point; he defining the most primeval, most fundamental fractal.

The very notion of fractality is not only a very ancient one with a peculiar recorded history, it’s one that is imbued within the very constitutive fabric of our consciousness — as with all of our discoveries.

History, or rather, academic fanboyism launched from the corpses of great thinkers, often has the tendency to completely eclipse intellectual history.

Tagged: fractalshistory of mathematicsmathematicseuclidgeometry

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23rd February 2014

Photo reblogged from Emergent Futures Tumblelog with 64 notes

emergentfutures:

Report: Bot traffic is up to 61.5% of all website traffic

Full Story: Incapsula

emergentfutures:

Report: Bot traffic is up to 61.5% of all website traffic

Full Story: Incapsula

Tagged: cyber securitybotnetshackingartificial intelligenceinternet

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17th February 2014

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Software documentation is like sex: when it is good, it is very, very good; and when it is bad, it is better than nothing. 

From the GATE users’ manual.

Tagged: gatenatural language processingsoftware documentationcomputational linguisticssoftware

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15th February 2014

Photo reblogged from Legacy of Tiamat with 203 notes

tammuz:

Alabaster relief depicting what could possibly be interpreted as a bucket of holy water, carried by a winged spirit with an eagle’s head from the Northwest Palace of Ashurnasirpal II at the Assyrian Imperial capital of Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.  
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

tammuz:

Alabaster relief depicting what could possibly be interpreted as a bucket of holy water, carried by a winged spirit with an eagle’s head from the Northwest Palace of Ashurnasirpal II at the Assyrian Imperial capital of Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.  

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Tagged: ancient assyriaancient near-east

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Source: tammuz

8th February 2014

Quote with 3 notes

Geometry is the art of correct reasoning on incorrect figures.

Tagged: geometrymathematicsgeorge polya

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25th January 2014

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The Game of Thrones reminds me of the Bible, but with less sex, violence, incest, rape, drugs, intrigue, pedophilia, and war.

Tagged: literary comparisons

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21st January 2014

Post

100 bucks says the Sochi Olympics will have some rather explosive political demonstrations from the Chechens.

Tagged: politicsolympicssochi2014

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11th January 2014

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Dear people who borrow textbooks from the library.

Please stop writing the answers to questions right next to the problem in the textbook. This is the exact same thing as writing all of the spoilers to a novel in the margins right when a new character is introduced.

This has been a public service announcement. Thank you.

Tagged: personalautodidacticismautodidactic problems

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1st January 2014

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New rule: if you live off welfare and disability, that’s fine, just don’t go one-upping yourself as some kind of anti-statist libertarian Moses.

Tagged: libertarianism

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1st January 2014

Link reblogged from Matthew Aid with 6 notes

Brief Summary of What We Learned About NSA in 2013 →

matthewaid:

January 1, 2014

Author’s Note: We have learned a vast amount about NSA and how it works over the past seven months. Since the first revelations hit the press in June 2013, I have been itemizing, indexing and databasing all the new information that has come out about the agency. My quick-and-dirty conclusion  - NSA today bears no resemblance whatsoever to the agency that existed 12 years ago on 9/11. Prior to the torrent of Snowden revelations, I would have said that NSA’s SIGINT intercept, processing, analytic and reporting capabilities were far greater than at any time in its history. Now, given the massive losses of sources and capabilities that the agency has suffered since June, I wonder what the short-term future holds for the agency. Readers should bear in mind that what we are reading in the newspapers today is now history.

Here’s what we learned about the NSA’s spying programs in 2013

Andrea Peterson

Washington Post

December 31, 2013

On June 5, millions of Americans learned the U.S. government was collecting and storing information about their phone calls thanks to documents from former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden. And over the following months, a barrage of stories revealing the extent of state-sponsored surveillance activities has held the front page of newspapers around the world captive.

But the sheer volume of information rushing past has made it hard to keep track of the sheer breadth of NSA spying programs. So I’ve gone back through seven months of revelations and compiled this handy summary.

Phone spying. The NSA collects information about everyone’s domestic phone calls — who you call, who calls you, when, and perhaps more information. While it denies intentionally targeting the location data of American citizens, it also collects 5 billion records a day concerning the location of cellphones and mobile devices around the world, including an unknown number of records about the the whereabouts of domestic cellphones that the NSA has collected “incidentally.”

Spying on online services. The NSA program PRISM allows the agency to request content and other types of data directly from major tech companies, including Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, Apple, and Facebook. But the NSA also infiltrates the links connecting Google and Yahoo data centers worldwide — effectively positioning itself to “collect at will from hundreds of millions of user accounts, many of them belonging to Americans.” The agency also scoops up millions of e-mail address books and contact lists globally. During the Bush years and up through 2011, it collected information about Americans’ e-mails and Web surfing too.

Tapping the Internet backbone. Not content with information collected from online service providers, the NSA also engages in “upstream collection" by tapping into fiber optic cables and other core Internet infrastructure. It also appears to be sifting through the content of e-mail and text communication as it flows across the U.S. border. While this surveillance officially targets foreigners, the communications of Americans may also be swept up, since some online services store Americans’ data on overseas servers.

Undermining consumer security. The NSA is waging a war on encryption — and has been winning by “using supercomputers, technical trickery, court orders and behind-the-scenes persuasion to undermine the major tools protecting the privacy of everyday communications in the Internet age,” according to The New York Times. It maintains a 50-page catalog of exploits and backdoors into the products of major tech companies — and intercepts packages to put some of them there. If you have an iPhone, they can get in it. Along with its British counterpart, the agency also targeted anonymous browsing tool Tor — albeit largely unsuccessfully. It also uses a system ofsecret servers to redirect and infect targets with malware tailored to compromise the target’s computer system. To identify targets, it piggybacks onto the tracking mechanisms used by tech companies to identify targets for exploitation — including one of the most common Google cookies.

Breaking its own privacy rules. The NSA broke its own privacy rules thousands of times per year according to internal audits. In a particularly unsettling revelation, NSA officers abused surveillance powers to snoop on romantic interests. The practice was common enough it had its own slang: LOVEINT. The secret court that oversees the NSA’s spying programs alsorebuked the agency for repeatedly misleading it about the scope of surveillance.

This list makes it seem like there is hardly anything the NSA isn’t doing — and it’s not even a full list. Countless additional stories or details suggest the scope of the NSA’s activities are far beyond what most Americans realized before reporting on the Snowden documents.

And as these activities have come to light, a public debate ensued as have lawsuits, presidential task forces, and attempts at legislative remedy. But so far none of these have resulted in meaningful policy change. The status quo continues, if with forced disclosures and administration arguments that the public just doesn’t understand how difficult it is to prevent the next 9/11 — even though there’s been no evidence publicly revealed so far that these measureshave prevented the next 9/11.

But if 2013 is the year the NSA’s surveillance capabilities were laid bare, perhaps 2014 will be the year the public figures out how to deal with it. As President Obama said, “we’re going to have to make some choices as a society.”

Tagged: nsabig brothersurveillanceprismspying

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